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Song Recital Leigh Music Society

This year marks the 47th Season of Leigh Music Society and it was a pleasure to perform a recital with Duncan Glenday on 2nd Feb 2020. The Society present seven concerts a year between September and March on Sunday afternoons in the Derby Room, above the library at the Turnpike Centre, in the centre of Leigh, Greater Manchester.

The Turnpike is a unique arts venue and since January 2017 Turpike, an independent arts organisation, has occupied the first floor of the iconic 1970s brutalist building. There are lots of activities happening at the centre with the aim to raise aspiration, resilience and encourage people from the across the community to take part in the activities. There are art exhibitions and weekly workshops – Simeon Barclay’s Bus2Move exhibition was just being installed and will be open to the public from 14th Feb. https://www.theturnpike.org.uk/bus2mov

Returning to sing for Leigh Music Society brought back lots of happy memories. Duncan and I performed a programme of English Song this year. The first time I sang there was in 2002 while I was studying at the Junior RNCM – I loved my time there! I was really thrilled that Karen Humphreys MBE, Head of Junior RNCM was at the concert – I’m always thankful for the opportunities, support and encouragement we had as young performers to step out for the first time in front of public audiences – and nearly 20 years later Karen is there in the audience, and all of her support and advice still means the world!

It was great to see a ‘full-house’ for the concert with many much loved friends in the audience. There is always a warm and friendly atmosphere and if you would like to attend a forthcoming concert please visit their website – https://leighmusicsociety.info/about-us/ The Society regularly invites established professional musicians from around the region to perform, and also provides a platform for young musicians to perform. If you are interested in performing a concert for them you can contact them by email.


Lyndale Cancer Support Centre Concert

On Friday 24th January 2020 I performed a concert for Lyndale Cancer Support Centre. The concert was the first event of its kind for the Centre; held at Volair in Huyton. I was so thrilled to sing with our local community choir Mersey Wave Music and their musical director Jason Ellis and the Northern Ukes Band . Together with Lyndale Cancer Support Center; we created a special programme of music with patients, families and carers and the volunteers associated with the center at the heart of the whole evening. The compère for the event was BBC Radio Merseyside’s Helen Jones and we are all so grateful for her support. Special thanks and congratulations to Lyndale Volunteers Vicky and Margaret for organising a brilliant night and the whole team at Volair who looked after us so well. The evening raised over £3,000 for much needed funds for Lyndale Cancer Support Centre.

Kathryn Rudge Lyndale Cancer Care

“Lyndale” has been providing one-to-one and group support to cancer patients, carers and their families in a warm, relaxed and friendly environment for over 30 years. The support center is run by volunteers and was established in 1983, providing help and support for Cancer patients throughout the Knowsley region. The charity is led by a team of trustees, key volunteers with many years of experience, and the service they provide is all confidential and free.

History of Lyndale

Lyndale was originally founded by Mrs. Mary Davies who was a local resident with personal experience of cancer – she recognised the need for additional support for patients receiving cancer treatment and originally began a support group within her own home, with approval from local GPs. Lyndale became a registered charity and the committee obtained statistics that showed the North-West with the highest incidence of cancer in the country. There has since been an ever-increasing demand for cancer support and the service they provide.

Cancer incidence and cancer-related mortality are major problems in England’s North West. Most recently Liverpool has been identified by Public Health England as one of the three most cancer stricken cities in England and cancer mortality in Merseyside and Cheshire is 76% higher than the European average. Every year in Liverpool, around 40% of all cancer cases are diagnosed by doctors in the A&E Department. In these cases the cancer is usually advanced and can be more difficult to treat.

In order to continue to serve a great number of people ‘Lyndale’ moved to the house on 40 Huyton Lane in 1986. It became the unique cancer support group within a homely and friendly environment that we know and love today. This was all financed by a grant of £36,000 from Knowsley Metropolitan Borough Council and £12,000 from St Helens & Knowsley Health Authority. The shortfall in funding of £11,000 was covered by taking out a 25 year mortgage. Lyndale Cancer Support Center and their volunteers now serve around 100 cancer patients and their families a week.

There was building work and refurbishment carried out in 2003/4 which was funded by the National Lottery and from the Mayor of Knowsley’s Charity Fund, and further funding was obtained from Merseyside Safer Cities & Knowsley Inclusion Unit. Lyndale is still run today entirely by dedicated and committed volunteers who provide caring support and information in a friendly relaxed and homely environment – as was Mary Davies‘ original wish. Little did their founder member and first Committee dream that the seeds sown in Mary’s small home, would lead to the beautifully extended and refurbished Lyndale of today!

Lyndale still does rely on donations and funding for running costs, the financing of teachers and therapists for the provision of complimentary therapies, relaxation sessions, yoga and beauty therapies, art and computer classes etc. which are all free of charge to all those who attend Lyndale. Lyndale also organises social events, outings and rambles. Every aspect of their administration, financial accounting and caring support has been carried out voluntarily since 1983.

Northern Ukes Kathryn Rudge Cancer
Northern Ukes on stage at Volair in aid of Lyndale Cancer Support Centre

More people are surviving cancer than ever before. In fact, cancer survival rates have doubled in the last 40 years as a result of improvements in cancer treatments and diagnosis – with thanks to amazing places like Lyndale for their excellent support. There is still, however, a lot of work to do to help reduce the number of people developing and losing their lives to the numerous cancer types. Through our music and events like this one we hope we can help to raise much needed awareness and support for wonderful places like Lyndale and provide uplifting events for all of the volunteers, patients and their families and friends.

If you would like to donate to Lyndale Cancer Support Center please visit https://www.justgiving.com/lyndalecancersupportcentre/donate or e-mail support@knowsley-cancer-support.co.uk


Mahler Symphony No.2 Kings College Chapel, Cambridge

On Saturday 18th January 2020 I performed as part of Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No.2 at King’s College Chapel in Cambridge for the Cambridge University Music Society . Andrew Gourlay conducted members of the Cambridge University Sinfonia and Wind Orchestra and the massed collegiate choirs of Clare, Gonville and Caius, Jesus and Selwyn Colleges. Elin Pritchard sang the soprano solo and I sang the alto solo.

Instagram @kathryn.rudge

The first rehearsal was the night before the concert and it was a privilege just to spend time with everyone – listening to Mahler’s incredible music in the stunning chapel and hearing the young players and singers, who worked so hard, under Andrew’s inspiring guidance!

Mahler’s Symphony No. 2, also known as the Resurrection Symphony, was written between 1888-94 (first performed in 1895). The Symphony was one of Mahler’s most popular and successful works during his lifetime and established his enduring reflection on life, death and the beauty of resurrection.

Mahler wrote of the first movement (Allegro maestoso), “We stand by the coffin of a well loved person. His life, struggles, passions and aspirations once more, for the last time, pass before our mind’s eye. And now in this moment of gravity and emotion which convulses our deepest being… our heart is gripped by a dreadfully serious voice… what now? What is this life – and this death? Do we have an existence beyond it? Is all this only a confused dream, or do life and death have a meaning?” One of the most powerful aspects of this work is that the fundamental human questions asked in the first movement of the symphony will receive their answers by the last. (With tidal-waves of emotions in between – just like life!) The second movement (Andante moderato) is a nostalgic reflection of happier times, along with bittersweet episodes and the third movement contemplates the possibility of the meaningless nature of life.

At the time he was composing the symphony Mahler was also setting music to some poems from the anthology of 300 years of folk literature, and the fourth movement of the symphony includes one of my most favourite songs; “Urlicht” (primeval light). This song was not originally intended to be a part of the Symphony and is taken from Mahler’s ‘Des Knaben Wunderhorn’ songs with piano accompaniment which were composed in 1892 and are based on a collection of poems by L. A. von Arnim and Clemens Brentano. ‘Urlicht’ is written in the key of D flat major which creates an otherworldly moment, taking us to a realm away from the Symphony’s overall tonality of C minor. ‘Urlicht’ is an expression of the ‘need’ and ‘pain’ of Man and it ultimately ensures the empty, meaningless dimension that Mahler portrays in the third movement is not the end. Through courage and belief in choosing to follow God’s guiding light – we are led to the divine final movement and the conclusion of the Symphony.

UNSPECIFIED – CIRCA 1885: Austrian composer Gustav Mahler. Photograph around 1885 (Photo by Imagno/Getty Images)

I’ve loved listening to and singing Mahler since I first heard his music while I was at studying at Music College. As the years go on and life moves along, it becomes more meaningful and this piece is a guiding light in itself.

Mahler is quoted as saying, “A symphony must be like the world. It must contain everything.” Mahler gave us the world and more in this one!

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The concert in Cambridge was performed in memory of Jamie Gardiner who died in January 2017 at the age of 22. It was incredibly special that Jamie’s father, Robert Gardiner, spoke to us all during a break in the rehearsal on the day of the concert. His support for the concert and tribute to Jamie was so moving – he expressed to us all beautifully how this piece in particular can help us to remember those we’ve loved and lost, and bring so much comfort and hope throughout our lives.

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In 2016 Mahler’s original score for Symphony No.2 was sold at Sotheby’s of London for £4.5 million, the highest ever price for a musical manuscript sold at auction! For so many of us Mahler’s score and the moments we are gifted to spend with it are priceless.


Music in Hospitals and Care UK – RNCM

It was a great privilege to perform in a concert with violinist Rachel Podger and pianist Christopher Glynn in November 2019; we were supporting the wonderful work of Music in Hospitals and Care UK! It was also so special to return to sing at Royal Northern College of Music (that’s where I trained in music 2003-2012.)

“Music in Hospitals & Care (MiHC) is a charity providing live music sessions for people who are receiving care or treatment in healthcare settings across the UK. Since 1948, MiHC has been breaking down the barriers which prevent people, regardless of their health or wellbeing, from accessing the benefits of live music. Our sessions are designed to humanise clinical settings, reach and connect people, encourage communication and meaningful interactions and evoke emotions and memories when it matters most. Each unique concert is delivered by professional musicians and tailored to meet the needs of the audience group. From the Shetland Isles and the Highlands of Scotland to Northern Ireland, the Valleys of Wales and down to the south coast of England, we operate in hospitals, hospices, care homes, day centres, special schools and community settings too. We have offices in England, Scotland and Wales, with over 680 musicians spread far and wide. Together, and thanks to the generosity of our supporters, we are able to bring the benefits of engagement with live music to over 90,000 people in care each year.” 

It was a privilege to be able to sing Richard Strauss songs with Chris and Rachel and to speak – sharing about our personal experiences as a family and the true benefits of music at any stage of life. Read more here: https://kathrynrudge.com/blog/music-and-cancer/


R-Charity Arriva Scouse 5K

“There is only today!” 

This 5k was so much fun – a great route around Liverpool city centre. Brilliant wigs and outfits and Scouse spirit! We ‘legged it’ round town for a great causes.

I ran for wonderful R-Charity the charity for Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen Hospitals NHS Trust. 

“Every year, staff working at the Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust make such a positive difference to the lives of thousands of people across Liverpool and the North West. To help ensure the best possible outcomes for these patients within our care, the R Charity fundraising team are continuously working with teams across the Trust to fund vital equipment and improve facilities.”

All of the R-Charity fundraisers had a lovely cuppa and a cake in The Cavern Club afterwards to celebrate. 

https://www.justgiving.com/kathrynrudge

Kathryn Rudge

Live at St Wilfrid’s 2019

Live at St Wilfrid’s is an annual series of live classical music concerts that take place at St Wilfrid’s Church – located, in a picturesque village on Church Lane, in the oldest part in Grappenhall, Warrington.

Grappenhall is not too far from both Liverpool and Manchester so it is always lovely to see so many friends and familiar faces there – I first sang for ‘Live at St Wilfrid’s’ in 2014 while I was still studying at Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester and returned again to perform a concert with Duncan Glenday in 2016.  

This year’s concert took place on 7th September 2019 and Duncan and I were thrilled to return to perform a song recital. The programme included songs by the composers Schubert, Berlioz, R Strauss and concluded with English songs by Quilter, Vaughan Williams and songs from my most recent album by Eric Coates.  Duncan also treated us to a beautiful piano solo of Brahms Intermezzo – Op118 No.2 in A major. 

The concert at Grappenhall took place during the same weekend as the 70th anniversary of Richard Strauss’ death in Germany on 6th September 1949. It was also very special to sing songs by Hector Berlioz as this year marks 150 years since his death. Performing songs by both composers within the same programme was a special way of celebrating their music and keeping in mind the strong influence that the works of Berlioz had on R.Strauss.

“Strauss loved Berlioz’s last opera, and Cosima [Wagner] recommended ‘Les nuits d’été ’ to him. In December 1890 he went to Karlsruhe for Mottl’s performance of Les Troyens – ‘a mixture of stupefying nonsense and spine-tingling genius’, was his verdict, conveyed to his father.” 

Michael Kennedy ‘Richard Strauss: Man, Musician, Enigma’   p61  
Live at St Wilfrids

St Wilfrid’s Church has been the sole local Parish Church for the people of Grappenhall for 900 years and it is mainly a 16th Century building – constructed in local sandstone with parts of it dating back to the 12th century. 

I loved seeing the knitted Mouse Trail throughout the church (I think it’s supposed to be for the children – but it was right up my street!:)) There is also a relief sculpture of a “Cheshire Cat” on the tower that watches over them all – and it is believed that this may have inspired the young Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll), whose father was vicar of the nearby Daresbury church.

So it’s farewell to Live at St Wilfrid’s for this year – with huge thanks to everyone who came along to see us. Already looking forward to next time! 

Live at St Wilfrid’s are a member of Making Music  – For details of the forthcoming concerts at St Wilfrid’s please visit their website.


Clatterbridge Cancer Centre 60th Anniversary Concert

I was delighted to return to sing for the Clatterbridge Cancer Centre and their Charity Carol Concert this year. The concert was a festive celebration of music, art and poetry for their ‘landmark’ 60th anniversary year – Congratulations to everyone involved and thank you for all you do!!

This year my Mum, Sue, began receiving palliative care for incurable stage 4 lung cancer – she is receiving amazing care from Clatterbridge Cancer Centre and Whiston Hospital. This comes just a few years after my Dad George also received eight years of cancer treatments for Multiple Myeloma blood cancer at Royal Liverpool Hospital and also through the Clatterbridge Cancer Center. It really means the world to me to be able to sing for the charity again and support the amazing work they do.

It’s been a heartbreaking time since my Mum received her diagnosis in August – she is an amazing lady, my inspiration and best friend! We know, more than ever, that every day we spend together is the greatest blessing – and that sharing music and celebrating special occasions like this one will bring us so much joy and hope through the hardest times ahead.

More than 200 people attended the event at Thornton Manor, hosted by Angela Samata. I was thrilled to sing with The Luminelles and Over The Water choirs, conducted by Matt Lammin. Wirral-based photographer and performing artist Mike McCartney read Amazing Peace: A Christmas Poem by Maya Angelou and poet Mandy Coe shared some of her wonderful work; embracing the themes of joy, love and laughter. Professor Dan Palmer, medical oncologist at The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, addressed the audience and expressed the importance of research in the future of cancer treatment and patient Becky Brothwood spoke so beautifully to everyone about her own cancer treatment.

After the concert there was a brilliant exhibition of artwork and photography by Mike McCartney, acclaimed sculptor Emma Rodgers – works from De Lacy Fine Art, Wirral Grammar School for Girls and Prof Arthur Sun Myint, who is a medical oncologist at The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, it was so lovely to meet everyone. I also found it really inspiring to hear Dr Liz Bishop, Chief Executive of Clatterbridge CC, speak about the future of the Centre and how much this will help cancer patients in the future.

The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre NHS Foundation Trust is one of the UK’s leading cancer centres providing highly specialist cancer care to a population of 2.3m people across Cheshire, Merseyside and the surrounding areas including the Isle of Man. Based in Wirral, Merseyside; treatment is also supported by a £17m radiotherapy centre in Aintree, Liverpool. They also operate specialist chemotherapy clinics in seven of Merseyside’s district hospitals and deliver a pioneering Treatment at Home service. This enables them to provide a comprehensive range of inpatient care, advanced radiotherapy, chemotherapy and other systemic anti-cancer therapies (i.e. medicines) including gene therapies and immunotherapies.

The Clatterbridge Cancer Charity is the only dedicated charity for patients and research at The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre. The Charity helps to improve patient experience, fund vital research into the latest therapies and innovations in cancer treatment. They are embarking on a journey to change cancer care for the better, by expanding services in the heart of the population with the further ground-breaking research and therapies they undertake. In the next few years they are building Liverpool’s first cancer hospital in the heart of the city, backed by the Clatterbridge Cancer Charity’s £15m appeal! Find out more about the charity here; https://www.clatterbridgecc.nhs.uk/charity/home

What a beautiful night it was! Merry Christmas and heartfelt thanks to the Clatterbridge Cancer Centre for the wonderful work they do.


Sea Pictures at Scarborough – Ryedale Festival

Scarborough Spa, Ryedale Festival

Every year, the Ryedale Festival welcomes outstanding performers from all over the world, both established and emerging, to perform a wide-ranging and distinctive programme in the many spectacular venues in and around Ryedale, North Yorkshire – an area full of history and natural beauty.  Under the present Artistic Director, wonderful Christopher Glynn, the festival continues to go from strength to strength!

It was such an honour this year to be invited by the Festival to sing Elgar’s ‘Sea Pictures‘ in the wonderful setting of Scarborough Spa Grand Hall with Conductor  Renato Balsadonna and the Orchestra of Opera North in July this year.  The North Yorkshire coastline is my favourite – since I was a child we’ve had annual breaks here and it holds so many happy memories.  To return to Scarborough and perform this beautiful piece right beside the sea was very special indeed!

This was my final concert before the Summer break with a lovely warm audience – when we came out of the Grand Hall to head home we were greeted by a spectacular firework display which was taking place on the sea front of the Scarborough bay.  Perfect ending to a wonderful time!

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Here’s the Blog I wrote about it all when I was gearing up for the performances with the orchestra of Opera North recently;

I am so thrilled to be performing Elgar’s incredible piece ‘Sea Pictures’ song cycle (Op 37) with The Orchestra of Opera North and conductor Ben Gernon at Huddersfield Town Hall on Sunday 25th February 2018.
My first experience of singing Elgar’s Sea Pictures was with the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Ben in Elgar’s beloved town of Malvern in May 2016. It was so magical to have the opportunity to perform the songs there for the first time. It also happened to be the anniversary of Elgar’s death and members of the Elgar Society who were present invited me to a gathering the following day at his graveside in St Wulstan’s Church in Little Malvern. It made it all a very special memorable occasion and really gave me a beautiful insight into Elgar’s life and also the opportunity to meet lots of people who are passionate about celebrating Elgar’s music and his life too – the more I learn about him and his music it’s not hard to see why!
Sea Pictures are a set of five poems set to music
1.Sea Slumber Song
2. In Haven (Capri)
3. Sabbath Morning at Sea 4. Where Corals Lie
5. The Swimmer

Five contrasting, unique and stunning pictures that conjure up images of the magnitude and mystery of the sea – the moment when you look out to sea and it takes your breath away, seeing the horizon across the vast expanse of the water – at times
the wonder of the sea is indescribable. Elgar knew so well how to portray it through this music that captures our emotions and imagination. The songs are an adventure, full of moments as onlookers to observe the scene, to hold each other close through all weathers, discover an ethereal calm, reflect upon the mystical qualities of the landscape and contemplate the power of the crashing waves.
The texts are all by different poets and Elgar works a miracle conveying the power and beastly nature of the sea through his setting. I am so enamoured by this work because the music and text also convey so beautifully our own vulnerabilities. I feel this particularly though song 2 – ‘In Haven’ with the text written by Elgar’s wife Alice – it is perhaps the simplest of all the songs with 3 strophic verses and through it he allows us that special moment to treasure the intimacy and unity of two people. Throughout the work I feel we come face to face with nature versus love – ultimately for me I have found in these songs the story of a soul, full of that love and faith with the music always inspiring us to contemplate the whirlwind that is life and the galloping waves as we race against time. This work is a complete gift.

As part of my initial preparations with the piece, I was thrilled to have the opportunity to discuss the songs with the world renowned mezzo soprano Dame Janet Baker. I had previously worked with her in coaching on the RPS/ YCAT Phillip Langridge mentoring scheme and she very kindly agreed to speak with me about the songs. It was such an honour – I have long admired Dame Janet’s recording of the songs which I had listened to during my student days at Royal Northern College of Music. It was a dream come true to be able to discuss the score in detail with her, talk about the composers intentions and about how as singers we embark upon the interpretation and challenges of the piece.
It is always really inspiring to gain perspective and advice like this.. and to have the opportunity to reflect on it.. preferably for this piece somewhere by the sea (any excuse!). One of my very favourite places by the sea is on the North Yorkshire coast – Whitby! I have visited Whitby for many years with my family and spent lots of special times there. I never cease to be enthralled and inspired by the changing mood of the sea and landscape – I feel it is one of the most picturesque harbours in the UK. I’ve also spent some time with my Sea Pictures score and Elgar’s perfect soundtrack there! Like with any music, with any artist – year on year these are pieces that are growing with me. I am so grateful to have the chance at this moment in time to explore them.
Since my initial performance of Sea Pictures with orchestra, I have also performed the songs with piano accompaniment. Elgar himself performed the songs with piano on several occasions. Two of the songs were performed with piano accompaniment for Queen Victoria at Balmoral two weeks after their orchestral premier! Audiences have certainly enjoyed listening to the songs performed in intimate settings such as Pembroke College with pianist Joseph Middleton and in Dorchester Abbey with pianist James Baillieu and also at Leeds College of Music for a BBC Radio 3 broadcast. I am also excited to be performing the songs again with piano later this year this time with pianist Jonathan Fisher for the forthcoming Leeds Lieder Festival at Leeds College of Music in April 2018 and again with James Baillieu at the Portico Festival of Ards in Ireland in May 2018.
..So far I have resisted the temptation to wear a mermaid outfit complete with fishtail as Dame Clara Butt had done in the first performance of the songs at the Norwich Festival in 1989…(give it time!). I would have loved to have been there that night!! It is said that when Elgar first called on Dame Clara to discuss the work she was in the bath and refused to see him. Can you imagine!!

I can’t wait to perform the songs with the brilliant Orchestra of Opera North.
I have had the privilege of sharing some great times with them in past opera productions at the Leeds Grand Theatre and on tour and I am really looking forward to the forthcoming production of Mozart’s Don Giovanni too. It will be the “icing on the cake” to explore Sea Pictures together! I absolutely love performing English song repertoire and Elgar’s music has a special place in my heart that only grows stronger the more I get to know his music – he has brought me so much pleasure already in my life, as I know he does for so many people. So this will be a total joy to share this experience with the Orchestra of Opera North and the audience in Huddersfield as we ride the waves together!

About Scarborough Spa.. The Spa Complex is unique among British venues, not only because of its location; right on the sea front in the scenically beautiful South Bay, but also for the variety of facilities housed in what is largely a magnificent Victorian building. In the 17th century, spa waters were discovered by Thomasin Farrer, the wife of one of Scarborough’s leading citizens, John Farrer. She found natural spring water bubbling out beneath the cliff to the south of the town! The precursor to the present Scarborough Spa complex became a fashionable attraction. Scarborough Spa is a Grade II* listed building in the South Bay of Scarborough and the Grand Hall seats nearly 2,000 people.

 

Related Articles: https://www.thescarboroughnews.co.uk/lifestyle/one-for-the-diary-orchestra-of-opera-north-1-9167230


Kathryn is an opera singer, concert and song recitalist from Liverpool. Described by What's on Stage as 'One of Britain's brightest young mezzos' and named as The Times 'Rising Star of Classical Music.' Kathryn regularly works with leading singers, instrumentalists, orchestras and ensembles in concerts and broadcasts nationally and internationally.

Kathryn has performed leading opera roles for companies including English National Opera, Glyndebourne and Opera North. She has made recordings for Hyperion, Chandos, Somm, Nyman Records and her debut CD 'Love's Old Sweet Song' was released by Champs Hill Records. Kathryn was a BBC Radio 3 New Generation Artist 2015-17.

Kathryn trained at the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester, studying voice with Susan Roper and piano with Naomi Kayayan. Her many awards include the Joyce and Michael Kennedy Award for the Singing of Richard Strauss, Susan Chilcott Scholarship and The Joaninah Trust Award. Kathryn is an Associate Artist of the Royal Northern College of Music and teaches singing at The University of Manchester.

Kathryn co-founded Mersey Wave Music Choir in 2012 in her home city of Liverpool and was recipient of the Merseyside Woman of the Year Arts Award in 2016. Kathryn has a passion for championing and supporting live music making within community and healthcare settings; especially to support staff, patients and relatives throughout healthcare. In loving memory of her parents who were both cancer patients.

Read More here: Music and Cancer

Contact kathryn.rudge@live.co.uk

Copyright Kathryn Rudge 2019